SETI Institute is Hiring - Executive Assistant

The SETI Institute is seeking an Executive Assistant to provide high level administrative support to the President/CEO, and the Management team. 

The primary role of the Executive Assistant is to provide executive level support to the President/CEO by managing projects, schedules, events and tasks that will enable the President/CEO to focus on the business strategy. This role also serves as the liaison to the Board of Trustees, and is the primary point of contact for all matters relating to the Office of the Chief Executive.  In addition, this position will provide assistance to the Director of Education and Outreach, the Director of the Carl Sagan Center for Research, and other senior management staff. The Executive Assistant must enjoy working wih in an environment that is mission and result driven and be able to effectively and professionally communicate and interact with the Board of Trustees, NASA’s administrative departments, SETI scientists, the outside business community, and executives.  This is a highly visible position and requires impeccable organization, business judgement, verbal and written communication skills, and attention to detail. The ability to work independently and proactively on a variety of projects from conception to completion and with high level of professionalism and discretion, is a must.

Read More and Apply at: https://home.eease.adp.com/recruit2/?id=15417981&t=1

 

 

 

 

Orbiter Detects Changing Climate on Early Mars

The early Martian climate remains hotly debated by scientists because the surface mineralogy and morphology indicate abundant liquid water was present, while atmospheric modeling is challenged to create conditions supportive of liquid water on the surface of early Mars. New results by SETI Institute researcher Dr. Janice Bishop and Houston colleague Dr. Elizabeth Rampe indicate a change in climate from the environment supporting liquid water and formation of clay minerals to an environment where liquid water was no longer abundant on the surface. This study is published in the August issue of EPSL.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X16302035

Study lead author Dr. Bishop chose a site on Mars called Mawrth Vallis for the investigation “due to the great diversity of clays and other minerals formed by interactions with water in this location.” In addition to the crystalline phyllosilicates discovered previously, this study identified poorly crystalline Al- and Si-rich materials. This study demonstrates that the poorly crystalline aluminosilicates allophane and imogolite comprise a significant portion of the uppermost stratum of the clay-rich units. “These phases are unique to immature soils derived from volcanic ash in well-drained, mildly acidic environments on Earth,” according to Dr. Rampe. This study documents a transition through time from the lowermost, smectite-bearing units to the uppermost allophane/imogolite unit at Mawrth Vallis. Bishop emphasizes “the importance of these results lies in that they signify a change in climate on Mars from a warm and wet environment to one where water was sporadic and likely depleted rapidly”.

Two kinds of spectral images were used from Martian orbiters: data from the visible/near-infrared CRISM [JB1] (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and data from the thermal-infrared TES [JB2] (Thermal Emission Spectrometer) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor orbiter. “The results from these two spectrometers had been conflicting in the past with regard to clay mineral detections, so the agreement reached in this study marks a monumental step forward in our understanding of these important indicators of water on the red planet” says Dr. Bishop. Modeling of the TES data in this new study indicates that about half of the surface rocks in light-toned regions are comprised of clays, silica and poorly crystalline aluminosilicates, which is in agreement with modeling of the CRISM data.

View of CRISM image showing allophane/imogolite unit above the crystalline clays.

Mawrth_ms_TIR_fig_updated_20160127.jpg

TES model results showing the presence of ~50% poorly crystalline aluminosilicates, phyllosilicates and opal/glass phases, which is comparable to VNIR modeling results indicating ~50% clays.

Revised - SETI Institute Science Blog text – 29 Aug 2016

EPSL paper published online, to be published in print in August, 2016

 

Pages


Report Nov

Activity Report of the SETI Institute - October 2016

As the winter rains move in to Bay Area and the days get shorter, SETI Institute scientists are still keeping busy. They continue to unravel more puzzles about our local celestial neighbors, as well as other worlds many light-years away.
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  • Report Nov

    As the winter rains move in to Bay Area and the days get shorter, SETI Institute scientists are still keeping busy. They continue to unravel more puzzles about our local celestial neighbors, as well as other worlds many light-years away.

    Read More
    Report Nov
  • Doug Lin's SETI Talk on Tuesday November 29, 2016. Recent observations indicate that super Earths are common whereas gas giants are relatively rare.

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  • Brain Dust

    The brain is a hot research topic, but despite all efforts, your grey matter largely remains a black box – an indecipherable web of neurons with a hidden subconscious agenda. But tiny sensors could shed light on what’s going on in your noggin. Find out what implanted “brain dust” may reveal about who you are.

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    Brain Dust
  • Mehmet Alpaslan's SETI Talk on Tuesday November 22, 2016. When viewed at the largest scales, the distribution of galaxies in the Universe resembles a complex, tangled web: an interconnected network of filaments of galaxies that surround vast, empty voids.

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  • Janice Bishop gave a SETI Talks about "History of Clays on Mars: How We Found Them and Why They are Important for Astrobiology" on Tuesday, November 08 2016 - 12:00 pm, PST. Detecting clays on Mars has had a rocky history over the past 4 decades, but detecting them on the surface today is becoming commonplace.

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  • It has just become harder for surprise meteor showers to escape our attention. On October 1, the third station of a new 48-camera, video-surveillance network in the United Arab Emirates has come online to help map meteor showers. The network complements the existing 80-camera Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) network twelve time zones later in California.

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  • milky way galaxy

    Soliciting Community Input for the Advancement of the Search for Intelligent Life in the Universe, and the Creation of a Multidisciplinary Virtual Institute for SETI Research.

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    milky way galaxy
  • Drake Frank

    Frank Drake had a problem. It was the fall of 1961, a year after his pioneering SETI experiment: Project Ozma. Using an 85-foot antenna in Green Bank, West Virginia, Drake had unfurled the intriguing possibility that we might find proof of intelligent beings by simply eavesdropping on their broadcasts.

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    Drake Frank
  • Marion Nachon's SETI Talk on Tuesday November 01, 2016. Located on Curiosity's mast, the ChemCam instrument ("Chemistry and Camera") uses a laser to provide the elemental composition of geological features along the rover's path.

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  • Please join us at NUMU on November 5th at 3 pm for a panel with the artists and scientists including Charles Lindsay, Jill Tarter, Martin Wilner, Oana Marco, Danny Bazo, Karl Yerkes, Marco Peljhan, Friedemann Freund, Rachel Sussman, Jon Jenkins, Mark Showalter and George Bolster.

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